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  1. Notes: 2 / Tuesday, October 23rd, 9:44 ET
    Butternut Squash and Carrot Soup
Last week we got a few freakishly large carrots, two beautiful butternut squash and some kale our our CSA in Long Island City. I wasn’t sure what to do with it, but plugged the ingredients into Gojee and ended up finding this recipe. 
I made a few modifications. And, as usual, I didn’t really measure anything.
Ingredients: 

2 medium sized butternut squash, peeled and cut into cubes2 large carrots, peeled and cut into cubes1 medium spanish onion, chopped1 large leek, cleaned and chopped1.5 tetra packs of chicken broth (or whatever you need to cover everything in the pot)A few strips of thick cut, high quality smoked bacon, choppedSome fresh ground nutmegA spot of heavy creamSome oil for fryingFresh kale, chopped 

Directions:
Put a bit of oil in a large pot, just to coat the bottom and toss in most of the bacon and cook for 2-3 minutes over medium heat (save a strip for later)
Add the leeks and onion and cook for 5 minutes, until onion starts to become transparent
Add the squash and carrots and cook for about 10 minutes, just until things soften up. If you get some nice brown bits on the bottom, even better!
Add chicken broth, making sure that everything in the pot is covered
Simmer over medium heat for about an hour or whatever fits your schedule. Just make sure everything is fully cooked. 
Use an immersion blender, or transfer to a regular blender in batches, and blend until smooth.
Salt and pepper to taste.
To prepare the garnish: chop up and fry some bacon in a small saute pan. Transfer to paper towels when crispy. Chop up some kale and throw it into the hot bacon grease. Fry until crispy.
Finish your soup with some grated nutmeg, the bacon bits and the kale.
This made enough for two of us to have soup for every meal for 2-3 days. I know, who wants soup at every meal? You will, once you try this soup. It’s awesome. 

    Butternut Squash and Carrot Soup

    Last week we got a few freakishly large carrots, two beautiful butternut squash and some kale our our CSA in Long Island City. I wasn’t sure what to do with it, but plugged the ingredients into Gojee and ended up finding this recipe

    I made a few modifications. And, as usual, I didn’t really measure anything.

    Ingredients

    2 medium sized butternut squash, peeled and cut into cubes
    2 large carrots, peeled and cut into cubes
    1 medium spanish onion, chopped
    1 large leek, cleaned and chopped
    1.5 tetra packs of chicken broth (or whatever you need to cover everything in the pot)
    A few strips of thick cut, high quality smoked bacon, chopped
    Some fresh ground nutmeg
    A spot of heavy cream
    Some oil for frying
    Fresh kale, chopped 

    Directions:

    1. Put a bit of oil in a large pot, just to coat the bottom and toss in most of the bacon and cook for 2-3 minutes over medium heat (save a strip for later)
    2. Add the leeks and onion and cook for 5 minutes, until onion starts to become transparent
    3. Add the squash and carrots and cook for about 10 minutes, just until things soften up. If you get some nice brown bits on the bottom, even better!
    4. Add chicken broth, making sure that everything in the pot is covered
    5. Simmer over medium heat for about an hour or whatever fits your schedule. Just make sure everything is fully cooked. 
    6. Use an immersion blender, or transfer to a regular blender in batches, and blend until smooth.
    7. Salt and pepper to taste.
    8. To prepare the garnish: chop up and fry some bacon in a small saute pan. Transfer to paper towels when crispy. Chop up some kale and throw it into the hot bacon grease. Fry until crispy.
    9. Finish your soup with some grated nutmeg, the bacon bits and the kale.

    This made enough for two of us to have soup for every meal for 2-3 days. I know, who wants soup at every meal? You will, once you try this soup. It’s awesome. 

    Comments
     
  2. Monday, August 20th, 3:48 ET

    What will happen when funding dries up?

    Question: What will happen when funding dries up?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    A few different things could happen:

    1. Depending on the capital markets, there may not be a lack of funding at all. Some of these companies will raise additional rounds.
    2. Some will IPO.
    3. Some will realize their cashflow positive revenue goals.
    4. Many will go out of business, which is totally normal (and necessary).
    5. Or, we’ll enter a period of consolidation where those business with more capital will acquire, at fire sale prices (see Digg), the companies who are lacking capital.


    All of these things happens on a very regular basis. Just because a lot of companies raised C or D rounds in the last 24 months doesn’t mean that those and younger companies won’t be able to raise additional rounds. 

    There’s a lot of capital out there. But, if it did dry up, for whatever reason, companies would raise funds from the public (IPO) or put themselves up for sale.

    Comments
  3. Monday, August 20th, 2:26 ET

    What are ways to get a sustainable income with the least amount of work?

    Question: What are ways to get a sustainable income with the least amount of work?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    You could sell music samples and loops.

    From what I understand, this is a fairly lucrative business. It requires you to create the samples, but you’re doing that anyway, since you’re producing electronic music. 

    You can use a simple shopping cart system, like Shopify, for the infrastructure.

    You don’t have to worry about drop shipping or order fulfillment.

    Comments
  4. Monday, August 20th, 12:50 ET

    Is tipping creeping upwards in the US?

    Question: Is tipping creeping upwards in the US?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    If you are paying less than 18-20% for good service, then yes, you are undertipping. 

    Here’s how I see it:

    • 0% for really terrible, malicious service - you should also talk to the manager
    • 10% for bad service, but not purposefully bad (maybe it’s just really busy and they are understaffed, maybe your waiter just isn’t a great waiter or maybe they are having an off night)
    • 15% for normal service, not good, not bad
    • 20% for good to great service
    • 25% for the best service you’ve ever had and/or to compensate for something specific (for example: if you brought your crying baby to a place that doesn’t have many kids and they were really accommodating about it or you made a ton of substitutions in your order and your waiter was graceful and accommodating about it).


    In the US, like it or not, tipping is part of the cost of eating out and the current system says that the cost is somewhere between 15 and 20%. You just have to factor that into your food budget.

    Comments
  5. Monday, August 20th, 11:28 ET

    What ad networks are the best for monetizing Canadian traffic?

    Question: What ad networks are the best for monetizing Canadian traffic?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    You didn’t say if you were looking for display, video, search or some other type of network, but I know that several video networks, including the one I work for, currently monetize Canadian traffic. 

    In my experience, Canadian traffic is worth about as much, if not more, than US traffic. It’s just not particularly scaleable, because there is a smaller overall population.

    The “best” depends on a number of factors like:

    • Will the network even accept you? This depends a lot of what type of site you operate, how much traffic you get and if you’re a brand name or not.
    • What rate will they pay you? Is it a flat rate? A revenue share? Is it based on impressions (CPM) or performance (CPE/CPC)?
    • What will the fill rate be? Is the network guaranteeing a specific fill rate or are you at the mercy of their sales team’s success and network pacing at any given point?
    • How much flexibility will you give the network in terms of blacklisting specific advertisers, providing site-level visibility to advertisers, etc.


    You’ll likely have to contact several networks. Not to find the “best network,” but to find the network that fits your product and current business needs the best.

    In the end, you may end up working with several networks, each of whom meet a subset of these requirements to make up a more holistic revenue picture.


    Comments
  6. Sunday, August 19th, 5:25 ET

    I’m 21, male, and not rich. Where should I shop in New York?

    Question: I’m 21, male, and not rich. Where should I shop in New York?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    For staples (like work & casual shirts/pants): Century 21, but skip the location in the Financial District. It’s tiny and it’s a mess. They have a new store in Queens with a huge, huge men’s section that offers really great choices. 

    Pro tip: Take a day off work and go during the day, on a weekday. The place will be basically empty for stress-free shopping and changing rooms. If you drive, they have free parking and you can do lots of other shopping in the same complex.

    J Crew is also a great choice, especially for shirts. They have a great selection, high quality, but not pretentious. 

    For basics (like socks and underwear): Amazon. But, get a Prime membership for the free shipping. You can also use it to order everything from olive oil to toilet paper to paper towels to dog food.

    For suits: MySuitNY. Go to their location in Herald Sq, across from Macys, and get measured. Once they have your measurements, you can use their online suit builder application to design your own suits. Super easy. 


    H&M, Uniqlo, Zara, Daffy’s, Feline’s Basement: All decent choices for staples, but if you’re like me, take my pro tip and go during the week, during the day. The lack of crowds make shopping at any of these places so, so much more enjoyable. It’s worth using a day off every 6 months.

    Comments
  7. Sunday, August 19th, 3:59 ET

    What does it take for a digital ad network to be included in a trading desk?

    Question: What does it take for a digital ad network to be included in a trading desk?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    I’d say, in a very general sense, if you can meet the following, you’d probably be in a good position:

    • You can deliver at scale
    • You have a relatively low barrier to entry, from a technical integration prospective
    • Your network is safe for advertisers
    • Your prices are low


    It’s not particularly easy to hit all those, which is why so many networks cheat by adding sites that maybe aren’t exactly safe or faking scale by buying cheap traffic. But, if you can meet those, you would probably look attractive to the trading desks.

    Beyond that, it’s just good ole fashion sales. Develop your accounts. Build relationships. Close business.

    Comments
  8. Sunday, August 19th, 2:28 ET

    Does being a stock owner grant me any entitlement to additional financial information, i.e. revenue or valuations?

    Question: Does being a stock owner grant me any entitlement to additional financial information, i.e. revenue or valuations?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    Probably not. It’s likely that you own a common class of shares. Generally that class of stock has no voting rights.

    You should ask your CFO to be sure or have your own lawyer review your grant paperwork.

    Comments
  9. Sunday, August 19th, 12:53 ET

    What are the best low-carb foods that help satisfy carb cravings?

    Question: What are the best low-carb foods that help satisfy carb cravings?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    When I’m really craving carbs (aka: something sweet) I’ll take some heavy cream, add a little bit of peanut butter, a bit of unsweetened cocoa powder, a little splenda and whip it all up. Takes like 2 minutes total. Turns into an amazing chocolate, peanut butter moose.

    There’s no exact recipe. You adjust the amounts depending on how much chocolate vs peanut butter, etc you want. 

    Also try adding a bit of vanilla extract or almond extract. Yum.

    Comments
  10. Sunday, August 19th, 11:19 ET

    Why are there so many bros in Murray Hill?

    Question: Why are there so many bros in Murray Hill?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    For the same reason there are so many famous people in Tribeca, young families in Park Slope, Jews in Boro Park, old people on the Upper East Side, etc: people who share similar interests tend to form communities around those interests.

    Comments
  11. Saturday, August 18th, 5:21 ET

    Where is the best place to fish in New York?

    Question: Where is the best place to fish in New York?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley

    I can only recommend places that I’ve fished, but there are probably better spots:

    • On the fishing pier in Gantry State Park in Long Island City, Queens. It’s a beautiful park. The pier is relatively new and has fillet tables with running water. It’s surprisingly quiet (save for the helicopters landing at 34th St helipad) and has fantastic views over midtown.
    • City Island in the Long Island Sound offers many local fishing holes.
    • Boats in the Sound are always fun. It might take some work to find the right boat (the right captain, balance between size/cost/crowd), but it’s worth the work.
    Comments
  12. Saturday, August 18th, 4:00 ET

    Describe the smell of Chinatown?

    Question: Describe the smell of Chinatown?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    Depends on the day and the temperature, but I would describe it as:

    A combination of mildly fishy, stagnant water, wafts of greasy, but delicious, food, punctuated by waves of hot, burning plastic with an odd, faint, but ever-present, taste of moist socks.

    Comments
  13. Saturday, August 18th, 2:26 ET

    What are some best practices for riding a train to and from work in NYC?

    Question: What are some best practices for riding a train to and from work in NYC?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    Subway commuting pro-tips:

    • Get an EasyPay XPress Metrocard: This Metrocard links directly to your credit card and refills itself automatically, so you’ll never run out and you’ll never need to visit a Metrocard vending machine again.
    • Get an extra “pay-as-you-go” Metrocard: I carry two EasyPay XPress cards. One is an unlimited card that I use for my daily commute. The other is a pay as you go card that I use to swipe other people in. Who might you swipe in? Your boss, when you’re heading to a meeting. Your date, when you’re heading to a show. You mom, when she’s visiting from wherever you’re from. A stranger, if you’re feeling extra friendly.
    • Know which subway car you need to be on: Some New Yorkers call this “pre-walking.” Example: you’re heading from Station 1 to Station 2. You enter Station 1 at the north end of the platform, but you know that the exit at Station 2 is all the way at the south end of the platform. Instead of just standing there, waiting for the train and making that walk when you arrive at Station 2… pre-walk! Walk now, instead of waiting, so that when you arrive at Station 2, you’re already where you need to be.
    • Don’t stare at people. Even if they are really interesting/pretty/weird. It’s just rude to stare and people don’t like it.
    • Don’t yell at your friends or talk too loudly. Look around you. Notice how everyone else is either silent or talking very quietly. Do that.
    • Let the people off the train before trying to get on it. Just helps with the flow.
    • Take out your Metrocard before you get to the turnstile. Don’t stand there, blocking the way, while you dig out your wallet.
    • Walk on the right, especially up/down stairs and through busy connecting corridors.
    • If you’re in a station with en escalator, stand to the right, walk to the left. It’s cool if you want to stand there and let the escalator do the work, but move out of the way of people who want to walk.
    • Follow the MTA on Twitter for general updates (@NYCTSubwayScoop).
    • Find your specific line on Twitter and follow that, too.
    • If a very full train pulls up to the station and you notice a single car that’s pretty much empty, do not get on that car. It’s either dangerously hot because it’s 102 degrees out and the AC is broken in that car or someone just took a shit on one of the seats.
    • Take off your giant backpack. It’s hitting the person behind you and you don’t even realize it.
    • Don’t lean on the poles in the middle of the car with your entire back when other people are trying to hold the same pole. No one wants to touch your sweaty back.


    As with all things in this city: be kind, respectful and mindful that we all live very closely together and you’ll do just fine.

    Comments
  14. Saturday, August 18th, 12:56 ET

    How much does living in NYC as a young professional cost?

    Question: How much does living in NYC as a young professional cost?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    It depends on so, so many factors that you haven’t clued us into. I think that the best way to answer this would be for me to give you a cross-section of young professionals I’ve run across in my career, starting from the most expensive to the least:

    • Trust Fund: this young professional lives alone and owns his 2 bedroom penthouse in a full-service building in Manhattan. He probably paid around $3-5 million for the apartment, pays $1,500-$2,500 a month in common charges.
    • Experienced Finance Guy: this guy lives downtown, in a true 1 bedroom with a small office. He doesn’t have any roommates and pays $4,500 a month. It’s a full-service building.
    • Young Finance Guy: this guy lives a little further uptown, in a smallish 1 bedroom. He doesn’t have any roommates either. Pays $3,500 a month in a building with a doorman and some amenities, but nothing crazy.
    • Young Professional A: A does okay for himself. He lives in a large studio or converted 1 bedroom. No roommates. Pays $2,500 a month, but doesn’t have a doorman or any building amenities.
    • Young Professional B: B lives in a 1.5 bedroom (that’s a 1 bedroom with an alcove/office). He has a roommate. They split $3,500 a month in their part-time doorman building.
    • Young Professional C: C lives in a nice area of Brooklyn/Queens. He has a large 1 bedroom, no roommates. Pays $2,000 a month.
    • Young Professional D: D lives in a nice area of Brooklyn/Queens. He has a roommate. They split a very nice 2 bedroom apartment, at $3,500 a month. No doorman, as it’s a brownstone, but place is big and the kitchen is really nice. They have a little outdoor space, too.
    • Young Professional E: E lives in Brooklyn/Queens, by himself, but in an up and coming area. He pays $1,800 for  large 1 bedroom.
    • Young Professional F: F lives in Brooklyn/Queens in a huge brownstone. They have the first two floors and 4 bedrooms. There were 4 of them, but his roommate’s girlfriend just moved in so now there are 5 of them splitting $4,000 a month in rent.


    Everyone, regardless of circumstances pays some of the following:

    • Monthly unlimited Metrocard: $104/month
    • ConEd (electricity): $80-200/month
    • Time Warner Cable/Fios/Cablevision (TV and Internet): $45-150/month
    • Food (depends on how much you eat out vs cook): $400-2,500+/month
    • Drinking/entertainment (again, depends on how much you partake. I, for example, spend a lot more on food than I do on bars): $100-1,500+/month
    • Cell Phone: $100-200/month


    Point is: There are several ways to slice this pie. If you look at census data, you’ll see that people in New York cover a very broad economic spectrum. There is housing available to cater to all of those people.

    Comments
  15. Saturday, August 18th, 11:27 ET

    How can I find a reliable house cleaner in the Upper East Side?

    Question: How can I find a reliable house cleaner in the Upper East Side?

    Answer from Andrew Baisley:

    There are several ways to go about this:

    • Ask your friends, colleagues and/or neighbors for recommendations. It’s likely many of them are working with someone they are happy happy with.
    • Look for an agency (you can find several on Google), call them, ask for a quote and references. Check the references! Once you select an agency, they will send a cleaning person. If you aren’t happy with the result, you can ask the agency to send someone else. I use an agency and have switched my cleaner three times. I’m happy with the current cleaner.
    • Post an ad, or respond to ads, on Craig’s List. Ask for references. Check them!
    • If you have a doorman, ask them for recommendations.
    Comments
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Andrew Baisley

Director, Business Development at Tremor Video

Founder, Shopp.ly

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General thoughts about the industry I work in, my life in New York City, the music I'm listening to and links to websites that I find interesting.

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